Science

A rare Black Moon solar eclipse blotted out the sun over South America

Today, skywatchers across the Southern Hemisphere saw the first partial eclipse of the year.

A partial solar eclipse on April 30, one of two to occur in 2022, engulfed parts of South America, Antarctica, and the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The solar eclipse began at 2:45 pm EDT (6:45 pm GMT) in the far southeast Pacific Ocean off the coast of Antarctica. It lasted just under four hours, ending at 6:37 pm EDT (22:37 GMT) over the South Atlantic Ocean, according to TimeandDate.com, although the sun had still partially set for many observers.

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun. Today’s celestial event was a partial eclipse, meaning only part of the sun was obscured by the moon, depending on the location of the observer. The maximum eclipse occurred today at 4:41 pm EDT (20:41 GMT), when the Moon obscured about 64% of the solar disk south of the southern tip of South America from view.

Related: Amazing solar eclipse photos from around the world

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A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile.

A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile, taken by eclipse researcher Jay Pasachoff and his research team. (Image credit: Jay Pasachoff)

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A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile.

A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile, taken by eclipse researcher Jay Pasachoff and his research team. (Image credit: Jay Pasachoff)

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A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile.

A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile, taken by eclipse researcher Jay Pasachoff and his research team. (Image credit: Jay Pasachoff)

Image 4 of 6

A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile.

A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile, taken by eclipse researcher Jay Pasachoff and his research team. (Image credit: Jay Pasachoff)

Image 5 of 6

A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile.

A partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from Viña del Mar, Chile, taken by eclipse researcher Jay Pasachoff and his research team. (Image credit: Jay Pasachoff)

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View of the early stages of a partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from El Colorado outside of Santiago, Chile.

View of the early stages of a partial solar eclipse on April 30, 2022, as seen from El Colorado outside of Santiago, Chile. (Image credit: TimeandDate.com)

Unfortunately for skywatchers, today’s eclipse occurred over the sparsely populated areas of the Southeast Pacific and Antarctica, as well as several countries in South America, including Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia and Peru.

However, viewers in the US and other regions outside of the eclipse’s path were able to watch the event live thanks to Timeanddate.com’s online broadcasts, which offered views from Santiago, Chile and parts of Argentina, and the Indian YouTube channel Gyaan. ki gareebi Live, showing views from Cerro Chenols in the Argentinean province of Tierra del Fuego.

Today’s eclipse also coincided with the second new moon of the month, known as the Black Moon. Usually, a new moon occurs only once a month, when the side facing the Earth is completely hidden by a shadow. However, April began with a new moon on April 1 and ended with a second one today.

On the subject: 8 most famous solar eclipses in history

The next partial solar eclipse will occur on October 25, when the Moon will block part of the Sun from viewers in Europe, West Asia and northeast Africa. After that, we won’t see another solar eclipse until 2023. However, a total lunar eclipse is just around the corner, starting on May 15th.

If you want to prepare for the next eclipse and want to learn how to photograph a solar eclipse, check out our best astrophotography cameras and best astrophotography lenses to make sure you’re ready.

Editor’s Note: If you’ve taken an amazing photo of a solar eclipse and would like to share it with Space.com readers, please send your photos, comments, name, and location to spacephotos@.

Follow Samantha Mathewson @Sam_Ashley13. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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