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Facial Recognition: Cnil Considers Taking Action Against Clearview – Sciences et Avenir

Cnil’s president said on Wednesday, May 11, 2022, that she is considering filing a financial sanction case against U.S. facial recognition startup Clearview AI, which she notified last year to stop collecting and using public data. photos and videos on the Internet. “I’m seriously thinking about it,” said Marie-Laure Denis on the occasion of the presentation in Paris of the annual report of the National Commission for Computing and Liberties. A Clearview representative could not be contacted.

Practices that violate the GDPR

In December 2021, Cnil ordered the US company to “stop collecting and using data from people in France without legal grounds” and to “promote the rights of interested parties and satisfy requests.” to erase.” The Commission then gave the startup two months to comply with these bans. According to Cnil, the actions of the American company are contrary to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), adopted in 2016, which regulates the processing of personal data in the European Union.

Clearview AI is the subject of other research around the world.

In particular, Cnil noted that the US company, whose facial recognition software is used by law enforcement and intelligence agencies for their investigations, used the photos on the Internet without the consent of those concerned. Clearview disputed these allegations at the time. Marie-Laure Denis did not provide details on the amount of the fine that Cnil could impose on the company. Clearview AI is the subject of other investigations by several privacy authorities around the world, including Australia, Canada and the UK. In the United States, following a legal challenge accused of collecting face images without permission, the company this week adopted certain restrictions on the use of its database of more than 10 billion face images. To its detractors who accuse it of violating privacy, Clearview responds that banning the use of images available to the public would be tantamount to censorship.

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