Science

Google pays tribute to Dr. James Naismith, the inventor of basketball

This January 15, 2021, Google pays tribute to Dr. James Naismith. The one who will have been a prolific student is best known for having invented nothing less than basketball.

An athlete and an accomplished student

James Naismith was born in Ontario (Canada) on November 16, 1861. In 1883, he entered McGill University in Montreal. “Naismith was an intensive student, collecting 11 university degrees in the various fields of philosophy, religion, physical education and medicine“The Canadian University noted on its website. An accomplished athlete, he participated in rugby, football and gymnastics tournaments at McGill University and graduated in 1887. He then taught physical education. and became McGill’s first full-time track and field instructor before accepting a post at YMCA College in Springfield, Mass. In 1890, he left Canada for the United States there. ‘he will invent basketball.

Basketball: a distraction for rowdy students

Dr Luther Gulick, head of physical education at the School for Christian Workers (later renamed Springfield College), asked Naismith to create an indoor game that would provide an ‘athletic distraction’ for a rowdy classroom during the winter brutal new england“, explains McGill University. After reflection, James Naismith develops a game which combines precision and physical expenditure. He then outlines 13 rules which will become the first of basketball. On December 21, 1891, the game is presented to a class. It will become a real success.

James Naismith with a basketball and a basketball hoop. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

In 1895, Mr. Naismith moved to Denver to become a physical education instructor. In parallel, “he attended medical school at the University of Colorado (Gross Medical College) and graduated in 1898“. He died on November 28, 1939 of a heart attack at the age of 78.”Although Naismith rose to fame for his invention of a new sport, this stroke of genius never brought him fame or fortune during his lifetime, but he achieved enormous recognition.McGill University says. Today, several hundred million people play basketball around the world.

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