Gaming

In 2022, Xbox suspended 4 million accounts for cheating and inauthenticity

This year, Xbox cleaned up the mess and didn’t go too far. Microsoft just released its first-ever Xbox Transparency Report, which says it has suspended over 4 million accounts for fraud and inauthenticity.

Microsoft is publishing the Xbox Transparency Report for the first time. The overall numbers allow for a better understanding of what’s going on behind the scenes. Surely every Xbox gamer has encountered cheaters in an online game. Registered accounts are then reviewed by Xbox and banned if necessary. However, Xbox is also doing what it calls “preemptive work.” That is, it deletes accounts before they have time to commit negative and prohibited actions.

Xbox Controller © Sam Pak / Unsplash

In 2022, Xbox suspended a total of 4.78 million accounts. This number may seem particularly high, but most of these accounts have been automatically deleted by Xbox. Indeed, 4.33 million of these accounts were fake. They were created to cheat, spam players and simply interfere with online gaming. Moreover, a recent ranking determined that Minecraft, Among Us, and Fortnite suffered the most from cheating.

Fake Xbox accounts are most often banned immediately after they are created.

Microsoft, which loses between $100 and $200 on every Xbox series it sells, explained that malicious Xbox accounts are automatically deleted 99.9% of the time. They are locked immediately after creation. This proactive system helps protect servers and players while maintaining a healthier community.

According to Microsoft, auto-banning accounts “helps resolve faster, reduces the need for human review, and further reduces the impact of toxic content on human moderators.” So it’s a win-win situation for both players and Xbox teams. Apart from scams and spam, Microsoft also apparently monitors all other forms of cyberbullying: sexual content, phishing, vulgarity, etc.

In terms of reports made by players, Microsoft said there were 33 million during the year. However, the good news is that this number is down 36% from last year. Is this drop due to Microsoft’s proactive system, or is there simply less toxic players? This is not specified, but in any case positive for the players.

Kotaku

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