Gaming

The British accused the PlayStation Store of receiving commissions

A Briton is suing Sony over the 30% commission the company charges on PlayStation Store purchases. He claims that as a result, customers overpay for their purchases.

Various UK media outlets, including Sky News and The Guardian, are reporting that Alex Neil wants to sue Sony for £562 per customer, resulting in a total £5 billion settlement. Neil is the CEO of Resolver, a consumer advocacy organization.

Unfair conditions

The Briton claims that Sony puts forward unfair conditions to developers and publishers. The commission charged by Sony also hurts consumers, as developers and publishers pass these costs on to them. According to Neal, this commission should make customers pay more.

Commissions from game and app stores have long been a business model for hardware manufacturers. This way game consoles like Xbox and PlayStation are sold at the best possible price so that more customers buy one and then of course the main games. These commissions have been allocated in recent years. This is how Apple and Google, among other things, have been forced to lower the fees they charge for apps in their iOS and Android stores.

In cooperation with the Dutch IT channel

Various UK media outlets, including Sky News and The Guardian, are reporting that Alex Neil wants to sue Sony for £562 per customer, resulting in a total £5 billion settlement. Neil is the CEO of Resolver, a consumer advocacy organization. Unfair terms Briton claims Sony is imposing unfair terms on developers and publishers. The fees charged by Sony are also hurting consumers, as developers and publishers pass these costs on to them. Because of this fee, customers have to pay more because of this fee, Neil said. Fees charged by game and app stores have long been a business model for hardware manufacturers. This way game consoles like Xbox and PlayStation are sold at the best possible price so that more customers buy one and then of course the main games. These commissions have been allocated in recent years. This is why Apple and Google, among others, have been forced to lower the fees they charge for apps in their iOS and Android stores. In collaboration with the Dutch IT Channel

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