Science

Watch the first launch of India’s new rocket on Saturday night

The launch of the new Indian rocket is planned for the first time on Saturday evening (August 6) and you can watch the debut live.

The country’s Small Launch Vehicle (SSLV) is scheduled to lift off Saturday at 11:48 pm EST (03:48 GMT and 9:18 am Indian Standard Time on Sunday, August 7) ​​from the Satish Dhawan Space Center on the southeast coast India. Watch it live here on Space.com, courtesy of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), or directly through ISRO. (will open in a new tab).

The SSLV is a 112-foot (34-metre) four-stage rocket. It is capable of delivering up to 1,100 pounds (500 kg) into low Earth orbit, according to ISRO’s description. (will open in a new tab).

ISRO: Indian Space Research Organization

Technicians are preparing the Indian small launch vehicle for its debut launch, which is scheduled for August. 6, 2022.

Technicians are preparing the Indian small launch vehicle for its debut launch, which is scheduled for August. 6, 2022. (Image credit: ISRO)

In this first test launch, called SSLV-D1/EOS-02, the rocket will carry two satellites: the 300 lb (135 kg) EOS-02 Earth Observation Satellite and the 18 lb (8 kg) cubesat. called AzaadiSAT.

According to ISRO representatives, EOS-02 will provide high-resolution infrared images of our planet. AzaadiSAT carries 75 different payloads, each weighing about 1.8 ounces (50 grams). The cubesat payloads were created by female students from India and integrated into AzaadiSAT by students from Space Kidz India.

AzaadiSAT payloads will conduct various “femto experiments”. For example, one of them will measure the level of cosmic radiation, and the other will provide voice and data transmission on amateur radio frequencies. According to ISRO representatives, the cubesat is also equipped with a selfie camera.

Once the SSLV gets the wings, India’s fleet will have three operational orbital rockets. Already flying are two Polar Satellite Launch Vehicles (PSLV) and a Geostationary Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV), both of which are larger and more powerful than the SSLV.

Mike Wall is the author of Out There (will open in a new tab)(Grand Central Publishing, 2018; illustrations by Carl Tate), a book about the search for alien life. Follow him on Twitter @michaeldwall (will open in a new tab). Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom (will open in a new tab) or on facebook (will open in a new tab).

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.