Science

Woman accused of stealing cryogenic human bodies

This strangest story concerns the Russian cryogenic company KrioRus. The vitrified human bodies were allegedly stolen by Valeri Udalova, CEO of the company, who allegedly attempted to transfer them without the knowledge of the company. Her motives remain unclear, but there is believed to be a disagreement between her and founder Danila Medvedev, the Russian website Rusbase reports.

According to The Times UK, Udalova is Medvedev’s ex-wife. With this information, the conflict seems to find the beginning of an explanation, but why then have committed such an act? Currently, the company has 81 vitrified remains or whole bodies of human “patients” and 47 animals. And around 500 people have signed contracts with KrioRus to be cared for when they die, in the hope that one day medicine can resurrect them and reverse the disease or the underlying cause of their death.

A story to be taken with a grain of salt, for now

The tabloids practically pounced on the strange story when it was published, and we have yet to see any independent confirmation in the English-speaking media. Therefore, certain items and details should be taken with a grain of salt for now.

Disasters and controversies in the cryogenic conservation industry are not just beginning. In the late 1960s, for example, an unskilled businessman started a cryogenics business that ended in disaster when bodies were mistakenly thawed.

In the new case, Medvedev told Rusbase that Ms Udalova tried to pack several giant vacuum-insulated tanks containing the remains into a truck with a crane, as shown in a video. The police, however, prevented the robbery shortly after learning about the situation.

The conflict erupted several years ago, when Medvedev began to express his disgust at the way the company handled cryogenics. Udalova registered a new company in November 2019 called Open Cryonics, according to Rusbase, registering as a sole proprietor. This led Medvedev to file several complaints against his new company, claiming that Udalova was trying to take control of operations.

KrioRus cryogenic tanks, containing vitrified bodies, stored in liquid nitrogen. © EAST2WEST NEWS

Transfer of the bodies to new facilities.

He reportedly planned the flight for three months, envisioning special equipment capable of holding bodies in a supine position. “Medvedev wrote a false complaint to the police that the vacuum tanks were stolen,” Udalova told Rusbase. “I want to explain again, we have all the title documents for the tanks.”

So what can we deduce from this? According to these elements, Udalova would have stolen these bodies to store them in the facilities of his new company Open Cryonics, in order to transfer the cryogenized “clients” neither seen nor known. An operation that did not go according to plan. Whether Udalova actually legally possessed these bodies and whether their transfer was legal and misinterpreted is another story.

Udalova spoke in a 15-minute video posted on the KrioRus YouTube channel, detailing her side of the story. She also told Rusbase that she was ready to defend the case in court. The truth is that this is one of the strangest stories ever published by our editorial team.

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